April 5th, 2014

Afghan women share stories of surviving abuse

As Afghans vote in the country’s presidential elections today, watch this clip from our new short film, “To Kill a Sparrow,” for a look at what’s really at stake for women’s rights. 

Learn more about the film in our Q&A with filmmaker Zohreh Soleimani.

April 1st, 2014

We’re excited to announce our new short film, “To Kill a Sparrow,” will debut at The European Independent Film Festival this Sunday!

The powerful film sheds light on the hundreds of young women who are imprisoned in Afghanistan for running away from forced marriages and domestic violence or simply for falling in love and marrying against their families’ wishes.

Watch the trailer and learn more here.

You can also catch a shorter version of the film this Friday, April 4, on PBS NewsHour.

December 31st, 2013

Personally, this series is now the card that comes up in my mind whenever I read a story about Afghanistan. It permanently changed my view of the war, the withdrawal of U.S. troops and my understanding of where the country might go from here.

Anderson’s conclusion is haunting. All it is now is about getting out and saving face. We’re not leaving because we achieved our goals. We’re leaving because we’ve given up on achieving those goals, he says. All the fighting has been to introduce a hated and feared government, who in some areas make the Taliban look like the good guys.

The I Files producer Amanda Pike on Vice’s This is What Winning Looks Like, her pick for our favorite investigative reporting of 2013. 

Watch it here

June 14th, 2013

theifiles:

nbcnews:

Aesha, three years later: ‘I’m a very lucky girl’

(Photo: TIME magazine via Rock Center)

Three years after her photograph appeared on the cover of TIME magazine and became a symbol for oppressed women in Afghanistan, Aesha Mohammadzai has made incredible strides recovering from the night when her father-in-law, husband and in-laws cut off her nose and parts of her ears.

Continue reading

Editor’s Note: Watch Ann Curry’s full interview with Aesha Friday, June 14 at 10pm/9c on NBC’s Rock Center with Brian Williams

Six months ago, The Center for Investigative Reporting took an in-depth look at the oppression and intimidation of Afghan women.

The documentary takes viewers inside women’s prisons in Kabul and Mazar-e-Sharif where a majority of Afghan women have committed no other crime than being in love with the wrong man – or running away from abusive husbands. Watch “Prisoners of Tradition”: http://ow.ly/m3rMB

(Source: nbcnews.com)

Reblogged from The I Files
December 12th, 2012

With news of the assassination of the second female minister in Afghanistan this week, we look at the oppression and intimidation of Afghan women and the implications for their security as the U.S. withdraws its troops.

We went inside women’s prisons in Kabul and Mazar-e-Sharif to provide a rare glimpse of a shocking aspect of Afghan society little known to the outside world. The majority of Afghan women in prison have committed no other crime than being in love with the wrong man — or running away from abusive husbands who were selected by their fathers.

August 31st, 2012

Get more on this story - The geographic inequity of VA wait times is fully detailed for the first time in our analysis. Simply put: Veterans in sparsely populated states often encounter quick resolution of their compensation claims for problems ranging from back injuries to post-traumatic stress disorder while those in metropolitan areas languish.

Read our full story and find out how long vets in your area are waiting.

May 1st, 2012

In the combined wars of Afghanistan and Iraq, all 50 states and the territories have lost service members. More than 6,300 people have died and more than 44,000 have been wounded in action, many of whom were saved by modern medicine not available during previous wars. Click through to see our map of casualties by state.

February 27th, 2012

In our series Notes from the Field, senior correspondent Mark Schapiro speaks by Skype with journalist Mimi Wells on assignment for CIR in Kunar Province, Afghanistan. In this video, Mimi discusses how in Ghaziabad, outside the perimeter of an American base, Lt. Col. Dan Wilson tries to build relationships with Afghans amid violent clashes with insurgents. Watch earlier videos here.

February 14th, 2012

A new series called “Notes from the Field” on our (redesigned!) website, features reporter diaries and interviews capturing first impressions and raw experiences from the front lines. Senior correspondent Mark Schapiro talks by Skype with journalist Mimi Wells on assignment for CIR in Kunar Province, Afghanistan. In this first video, Wells discusses how female Marines at Camp Lejeune, N.C., before leaving on their mission, learn about Afghan culture and language. On the eve of their departure, they say goodbye to their families.

November 15th, 2011
With support from the Center for Investigative Reporting, multimedia journalist Mimi Wells is currently embedded in eastern Afghanistan with the Second Battalion, 27th Infantry regiment from Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. She reports in The New York Times’ At War blog: “Soldiers posted at Checkpoint 2.5 keep 24-hour  guard duty. Conditions at the checkpoint are bare, and its position is  so exposed that soldiers are required to wear body armor at almost all  times — even in the bathroom.” Read more from her story here. 
Photo by Mimi Wells

With support from the Center for Investigative Reporting, multimedia journalist Mimi Wells is currently embedded in eastern Afghanistan with the Second Battalion, 27th Infantry regiment from Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. She reports in The New York Times’ At War blog: “Soldiers posted at Checkpoint 2.5 keep 24-hour guard duty. Conditions at the checkpoint are bare, and its position is so exposed that soldiers are required to wear body armor at almost all times — even in the bathroom.” Read more from her story here.

Photo by Mimi Wells

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@CIRonline

At The Center for Investigative Reporting, we believe journalism that moves citizens to action is an essential pillar of democracy. Since 1977, CIR has relentlessly pursued and uncovered injustices that otherwise would be hidden from the public eye. Today, we are upholding this legacy and looking forward, working at the forefront of journalistic innovation to produce important stories that make a difference and engage our audiences across the aisle, coast to coast, and worldwide. What drives our work isn't profit – it's impact. Learn more at http://cironline.org/

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